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Nuclear power in the EU has fallen out of fashion

Nuclear is more prone to popularity peaks and troughs than many other energy sources, and it’s not looking good at the moment

THIRTY years after the Chernobyl disaster, nuclear power is still a core part of European energy generation. But questionable economics, insufficient state support and – in many countries – public hostility are likely to diminish its role in the coming years. Long construction times, safety risks, complex permitting and licensing procedures as well as significant clean-up costs add to the burden for developers. For now, by virtue of historical momentum, nuclear power remains a fundamental element of the European energy mix. It accounts for more than a quarter of the EU’s electricity supply and a higher share of its baseload power capacity. Half of the 28 EU states have nuclear reactors – a

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