Related Articles
Forward article link
Share PDF with colleagues

What Japan's Fukushima crisis means for gas

Fukushima's setback for nuclear power creates new opportunities for natural gas – now and in the future

For the nuclear industry, the images broadcast around the world from the stricken Fukushima-Daiichi plant and the accompanying headlines warning of meltdown were the realisation of a recurring nightmare. Over the past decade, concerns about climate change have prompted a shift in attitude towards nuclear power, especially as it can help reduce electricity generation's carbon intensity. The industry's big fear throughout this nuclear renaissance, however, was the possibility of an accident on the scale of Three Mile Island, or even Chernobyl. Fukushima may not be another Chernobyl, but the broad consensus is that the incident is far more serious than the partial-meltdown at Three Mile Island

Also in this section
Batteries are streets ahead
19 June 2017
Batteries, not fuel cells, biofuels, or natural gas, are winning the race to power the next generation of cars
A greener Gulf
31 May 2017
Blessed with sunshine and wind as abundant as its oil and gas, the region is starting to plot a cleaner post-oil future
Bright forecast ahead for solar energy?
12 May 2017
Solar costs continue to fall, recently hitting less than 3 cents/kWh in some parts of the world. But the scaling back of incentives and constraints of the existing electricity infrastructure could hinder future expansion